In the 1450's England was known for its bland cuisine. Traditional middle-class notions of diet put meats at the heart of the main meal, which usually was eaten at midday. Vegetables included potatoes and carrots, turnips and cabbage, and salad vegetables. The food of England has historically been characterised by its simplicity of approach, honesty of flavour, and a reliance on the high quality of natural produce. This has resulted in a traditional cuisine which tended to veer from strong flavours, such as garlic, and an avoidance of complex sauces which were commonly associated with Cathlolic Continental political affiliations. Traditional meals have ancient origins, such as bread and cheese, roasted and stewed meats, meat and game pies, and freshwater and saltwater fish.
Tea and beer are typical and rather iconic drinks in England, particularly the former. Cider is produced in the West Country, and the south of England has seen the reintroduction of vineyards producing high quality white wine on a comparatively small scale.
England produces hundreds of regional cheeses, including:
  • Cheddar cheese
  • Stilton cheese
  • Wensleydale cheese
  • Lancashire cheese
  • Dorset Blue Vinney cheese
  • Cheshire cheese
  • Double Gloucester cheese
  • Red Leicester
  • Blue cheese

The south of England has seen the reintroduction of vineyards producing high quality white wine on a comparatively small scale. Roast beef is a food traditionally associated with the English.